Embrace the beating heart of London

London’s Museum Penthouse takes eclectic style to new levels in the electric heart of book-rich Bloomsbury. Get ten together and invade Hyde Park and the Royal Opera House, catch the tennis or ride the Eye. Come home on your Boris Bike to 360-degree balcony views and tea on the rooftop terrace. Embrace the beating heart of London.

Eclectic joy in electric London

The Museum Penthouse drops you right in the middle of London’s metropolitan mayhem. Three floors of fabulous fun just a few yards from the British Museum come dressed to perfection by a top London designer. This is bookish Bloomsbury – affluent and abuzz with expectation, education, and intellectual curiosity.

If ten of you are doing London, this is how you do it, under our vaulted ceilings with rooftop-balcony views of the Museum. You’re close to Hyde Park and a short Tube hop from the Palace, Big Ben, the London Eye, the Tower, and the Royal Opera House. Or come for the events: Notting Hill Carnival in August or Wimbledon tennis in July.

You’ll do it all with an eclectic joy in the electric heart of London, in comfort, with taste, with curiosity, and maybe on a handy Boris Bike. Dine on the rooftop terrace, soak up the 360-degree views from the balcony, chill in the garden, settle back in front of the satellite TV, fire up the free wifi.

The glass-staircased Museum Penthouse takes style to new levels, but not without lush comfort. Three bedrooms, three bathrooms, squishy sofas, smart TVs at every turn, and a freestanding copper bath say so. Load up the Gaggenau fridge-freezer, cook on two fan ovens, then take your Nespresso out to the rooftop and drink it all in.

Gardens and grounds

Outside space in Central London? But of course. Take in the 360-degree views of Central London from the rooftop balcony. Or raid the Ole and Steen deli for meat and Drop Wine for a nice red, and soak up the sun as you dine on the plant-fringed terrace.

The black cabs and red buses rumble past, and the cosmopolitan mix of snap-happy tourists file in and out of the museum. Watch it all from an object lesson in quirky elegance with an eagle’s-eye view over everything that makes London special.

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Living spaces

Lounge in the living room; stay out for the summer on the balcony and garden terrace. However you play it, the Museum Penthouse offers 3500 square feet of eclectic, quirky luxury spread over three floors atop one of London’s premier postcodes. Move in, switch off with Netflix, then switch on again to electric living in downtown London.

London life will keep you busy all day and all night, but there’s entertainment to be had back at base, too. Pick from four flatscreen satellite TVs, all at least 50”, and catch your favourite movie or the big match. Or pump up the volume on the BOSE docking station. There’s no FOMO here.

Accommodation here is modern, but the metropolitan charm’s far from minimalistic. Visible metal beams, the vaulted ceilings, a glass staircase, the glass-floored mezzanine, quirky art, and exposed brick walls offer an exotic trip around the creative mind of one of Bloomsbury’s finest designers.

Sink back in the soft sofas indoors or head out for al-fresco attitude and altitude out on the garden terrace. Take a sundowner as you take in the British Museum. Or head up to the rooftop balcony and feel on top of the world with views over the leading landmarks of Central London.

Cooking and dining

Get the best out of the two fan ovens, large induction hob, and Gaggenau fridge/freezer by stocking up at Ole and Steen on the Tottenham Court Road, McKanna Meats, and Pimlico Farmers’ Market. Wash it all down with red, white or fizz from Drop Wine in Holborn. Or just sit in the sun and call up our Michelin-starred chefs.

Looking for something delicious on dial-up? Malabar Junction’s your first port of call for Indian, but 90% of London’s restaurants are on Deliveroo, Just Eat and Uber Eats. Get around the dining table, butter the bread, pass the wine, or head out to the garden terrace to soak up the sun and drink in the views.

Eat out at local pubs such as Covent Garden’s Lamb and Flag, where every dish is a signature dish, the Thomas Cubitt in Victoria for pan-fried turbot or dry-aged beefburger, or The Coach in Clerkenwell for seabream or duck magret sloshed down with a drop of Sancerre.

Eat Indian at Dishoom in Covent Garden or Soho. Tuck in to pizza and pasta at Circolo Popolare in Fitzrovia, or pick from four Barrafinas for all things Spanish tapas, including octopus with capers and solomillo de Rubia Gallega. Or tackle a 20-inch seasonal homeslice pizza at Neal’s Yard in Covent Garden.

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Bedrooms

Netflix TVs, gold-leaf mirrors, original fireplaces, four-poster beds, art-deco mirrors: bedrooms here are chaotically beautiful yet highly sleepable. Things are pretty quiet this high up in the sky.

Bedroom one is a kingsize en-suite with a smart TV and a large glass wardrobe. Hop out to the small garden terrace for breakfast or a nightly sundowner. Bedroom two is another kingsize with smart TV and views of the British Museum. And bedroom three is a kingsize with smart TV and small garden terrace.

The Museum Penthouse sleeps six comfortably, but two sofa beds help accommodate parties up to ten. Chill out, switch off, then switch the city on again in the morning.

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What people say

What people say

Fly the Eye and choose what’s next

Kick off with a flight on the Eye and choose what’s next from the top. Big Ben? Houses of Parliament? The Tower? Or just pop next door to the British Museum for two million years of human history. Get pampered at the Bloomsbury Hotel. Catch the latest Lloyd-Webber blockbuster. Or just raid the goodies on Regent Street and Oxford Street.

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